Sunday 14 April 2024

How to get rid of Avira Antivirus

How to get rid of Avira Antivirus

It is not an easy task to get rid of Avira Antivirus, usual steps via control panel do not help.

Below is the solution:

1) Open run command in the search bar bottom left of the screen and then type regedit 

2) Enter HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Uninstall

3) Right click on Uninstall and then Find and uncheck Keys and Values but keep Data checked while entering Avira next to Find what:

4) You should be looking for the a Registry where DisplayName has Avira as Data

5) Look for a line called UninstallString and then double click on it where you will then copy the Value data:

6) Keep all windows open and simply search for the run command again in the bottom left corner search bar

7) In the run command simply paste the copied value data and press Enter

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Saturday 13 April 2024

South Africa: São Thomé, Malta, Flying Dragon, Wilhelmine, Paparoa, Mary Anne & Pantelis A Lemos shipwrecks

SAHRA Maritime and Underwater Cultural Heritage

March 17:

“This day in our shipwreck and aeronautical wreck history”

1589: São Thomé, this Portuguese carrack foundered in the Lake Sibaya vicinity off the St Lucia coast in KwaZulu-Natal. It is reported that approximately 375 lives were lost because of the wrecking with some survivors having made it onto the lifeboats. The vessel had started leaking badly and although repaired, in the heavy seas the leak returned and could not be patched with the ship eventually foundering.

1818: Malta, this wooden sailing snow wrecked below the Military Hospital in Paarden Island in Table Bay in the Western Cape. It now lies beneath reclaimed land.

1855: Flying Dragon, this sailing barque caught fire and burned out in Simons Bay in False Bay in the Western Cape. The master’s son was sleeping below deck and lost his life.

1880: Wilhelmine, this sailing schooner wrecked in a south easterly gale in Mossel Bay in the Western Cape.

1926: Paparoa, this steel steam-powered ship suffered a spontaneous combustion which caused a fire in a hold filled with coal. It foundered near St Helena Bay off the west coast in the Western Cape.

1966: Mary Anne, this motor-powered fishing trawler wrecked on Kayser’s Beach in East London in the Eastern Cape.

1978: Pantelis A Lemos, this approximately 35 500 gross tonnage motor-powered bulk carrier wrecked on 16 Mile Beach, 2.5 km south of Tsaarsbank beach, in the Western Cape.

The Pantelis A Lemos (1978) was still very much visible in 1995

It ran aground in thick fog and due to poor navigation. A fire broke out because of overworked generators and no effort was made to extinguish it. A court of inquiry found the master, mate, and chief engineer guilty of neglect. It was insured for $50 million at the time and was one of the costliest claims in decades.

The Pantelis A Lemos (1978) had broken up considerably by 2013

The wreck has been battered and broken up by the surf and has predominantly disappeared below the water. Occasionally, pending the weather and conditions, some parts can be spotted sticking out from the beach and on satellite images.

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Friday 12 April 2024

South Africa: Gilbert Henderson, Prince Port, Rising Star, Alcyone, Craynip & Onibe shipwrecks

SAHRA Maritime and Underwater Cultural Heritage

March 16:

“This day in our shipwreck and aeronautical wreck history”

1847: Gilbert Henderson, this wooden sailing barque wrecked in a south-easterly gale, opposite the old wooden jetty in Port Elizabeth in Algoa Bay in the Eastern Cape.

1885: Prince Port, this British wooden barque wrecked just off Dyer Island on a reef near Geyser Rock/Robklip in the Western Cape.

The cape fur seals enjoying sunbathing on what is currently assumed to be the keel of the Prince Port (1885) on Geyser Rock/Robklip, just off Deyer Island

It is speculated that a storm later lifted a piece of its keel onto Geyser Rock/Robklip and the local seals regularly use this for sunbathing purposes.

1893: Rising Star, this iron steam-powered launch ran aground on Dassen Island off the west coast in the Western Cape after encountering a strong inset current. More research is required to determine whether it was refloated or if it became a wreck.

1942: Alcyone, this Dutch steam-powered merchant ship sank after striking two mines laid by the German minelayer Doggerbank, 40 km west of Cape Town in the Western Cape. All on board made it safely to the boats.

The Alcyone (1942), date and location unknown

1991: Craynip, this sailing yacht wrecked in a south easterly gale east of the Dassen Island lighthouse off the west coast in the Western Cape.

1992: Onibe, this motor-powered 5000 tonnage freighter collided with the 23 000 tonnage Fathulkhair and foundered south of Quoin Point in the Western Cape.

The Onibe (1992), date and location unknown

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Thursday 11 April 2024

South Africa: Montgomery, Eliza, Breerivier & Rigil K shipwrecks

SAHRA Maritime and Underwater Cultural Heritage

Henrietta Spasheti wreck in Namibia

March 15:

“This day in our shipwreck and aeronautical wreck history”

1847: Montgomery, this American sailing vessel wrecked in a south easterly gale on a reef off Cape Agulhas in the Western Cape.

1859: Eliza (in some databases the Faramound), this vessel is believed to have wrecked near the Great Brak River in Mossel Bay in the Western Cape with fragments of a vessel washing up there. Very little is known about it. 

1972: Breerivier, this South African motor-powered fishing vessel wrecked at Cape St Martin on the Vredenburg Peninsula off the west coast in the Western Cape.

1990: Rigil K, this sailing yacht wrecked at Bokpunt, just north of Cape Town, off the west coast in the Western Cape after drifting in heavy weather for almost 30 km.

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Wednesday 10 April 2024

South Africa: St Clair, Conservative, Sappho, Portsmouth & Cape Point shipwrecks

SAHRA Maritime and Underwater Cultural Heritage

Benguela Eagle shipwreck in Namibia

March 14:

“This day in our shipwreck and aeronautical wreck history”

1838: St Clair, this British wooden sailing vessel wrecked in a south easterly gale off Saldanha Bay in the Western Cape with the loss of several lives (the exact number being unknown).

1843: Conservative, this British wooden sailing vessel is presumed to have wrecked or foundered somewhere north of Yzerfontein, possibly near Vondeling Island in the Western Cape. Its wrecking was under mysterious circumstances as there was no indication of it having wrecked with the only evidence being six bodies that washed ashore.

1864: Sappho, this British wooden sailing barque wrecked in a south easterly gale at Blaauwbergstrand in Table Bay in the Western Cape.

1866: Portsmouth, this American sailing brig wrecked after its cables parted in a north westerly gale just east of the Coega River Mouth in Algoa Bay in the Eastern Cape. The cook drowned whilst trying to swim to shore.

1982: Cape Point, this South African steel-hulled motor-powered fishing trawler wrecked after running onto rocks south of the Gourits River mouth in the Western Cape.

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Tuesday 9 April 2024

South Africa: Harmony, Shylock, Gazelle, Liba & Falken Outspan shipwrecks

SAHRA Maritime and Underwater Cultural Heritage

March 13:

“This day in our shipwreck and aeronautical wreck history”

1826: Harmony, this British brig wrecked at Needles Point by the Knysna Heads in the Western Cape.

1839: Shylock, this wooden sailing cutter wrecked on a reef off Dassen Island off the west coast in the Western Cape.

1879: A strong north easterly gale claimed two vessels in Durban in KwaZulu-Natal: 

• Gazelle, this wooden sailing brig wrecked on Back Beach after its cables parted,

• Liba/Ziba/Zeba, this sailing schooner’s cables parted, and it was driven onto the bar at the harbour and then Back Beach where it wrecked. 

1953: Falken Outspan, this steam-powered whaler wrecked south of Robben Island in Table Bay in the Western Cape. It was being towed by the Carmen from Saldanha Bay when both vessels ran aground on Robben Island, but the Carmen was refloated whilst the Falken Outspan could not, and it was considered lost.

1967: Rietbok, this SAA Vickers Viscount (registration no. ZS-CVA), a public transport aircraft, wrecked in the ocean whilst approaching East London, in the Eastern Cape during flight SA406. All 20 passengers and five members of the crew were lost.

Daily Dispatch article on the wrecking of the SAA Rietbok (1967)

This wrecking event was shrouded in controversy with various reports emerging over the years, claiming that the loss of the aircraft was a political tactic to assassinate two vocal opponents of the Apartheid regime, Johannes Bruwer who was the acting chair of the Afrikaner Broederbond at the time, and Audrey Rosenthal, an American woman who assisted exiled PAC and ANC family members through the Defense and Aid Fund.

Die Burger article on the wrecking of the SAA Rietbok (1967)

However, several expert investigators have stated over the years that the loss was most likely accidental, owing to a once-off, or a combination of, several unfortunate circumstances. As the incident occurred late at night, in an area with strong currents and a rapidly dropping ocean depth starting at 60 m, recovery attempts were unsuccessful.

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Monday 8 April 2024

South Africa: Perseverance & Newark Castle shipwrecks

SAHRA Maritime and Underwater Cultural Heritage

March 12:

“This day in our shipwreck and aeronautical wreck history”

1826: Perseverance, this British wooden sailing vessel wrecked on Whale Rock off Robben Island in Table Bay in the Western Cape.

1908: Newark Castle, this steel steam-powered mail ship struck an unknown obstruction and sprang a leak, just north of Port Dunford, in KwaZulu-Natal. 

The Newark Castle (1908), date and location unknown

The seas were calm, but the master was afraid that the ship may capsize and made the call to launch the boats and abandon ship to ensure the safety of the 69 crew and 48 passengers. The next morning, the trawler Elelyn rescued all but one of the boats. The last boat attempted to reach the shore, but was swamped, resulting in a passenger and two members of the crew drowning. With the increasing roughness of the sea, the unmanned Newark Castle floated off and drifted 11 km north, finally striking a sandbank near the modern-day Richards Bay breakwater and becoming a total loss.

The Newark Castle (1908) aground

A court of inquiry was held, but they found that it could not be proved that the loss of the Newark Castle was due to any misconduct or negligence of the master or chief officer. The remains were discovered in the 1970’s during construction work in the Richards Bay harbour, but it was left in situ.

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Sunday 7 April 2024

South Africa: Maria, Hope, Adolph Fanny, Agatha, Seagull, Aelybryn, Dirkie Uys, Gansie Een & UIT-22 shipwrecks

SAHRA Maritime and Underwater Cultural Heritage

March 11:

“This day in our shipwreck and aeronautical wreck history”

1837: Maria, this wooden sailing brig wrecked during a south easterly in Algoa Bay in the Eastern Cape.

1840: Hope, this sail (schooner) and paddle-wheeled steam-powered coaster wrecked near Wreck point, west of Oyster Bay in the Eastern Cape. Whilst in a thick mist it struck a ridge of rocks about 200 m from the shore. The captain thought that they were 40 km from the shore. Only one of the two lifeboats were usable, so a second one was manufactured and towed to shore using the first. A return journey resulted in all 72 people that were on board being saved. The vessel became a total wreck and is often referred to being the first steamer to have wrecked on the South African coast.

1842: Adolph Fanny, this French sailing barque was put into Table Bay in the Western Cape for repairs and caulking in but was condemned after inspection.

1853: Agatha, this sailing cutter capsized and wrecked whilst crossing the bar of the Mthatha river near Coffee Bay in the Eastern Cape.

1894: Seagull, this three-masted wooden sailing schooner wrecked in a south easterly gale after its cables parted just off De Bakke beach in Mossel Bay in the Western Cape.

1943: Aelybryn, this steam-powered ship was the final vessel to be claimed by the infamous U-160. Late at night and unescorted the Aelybryn was struck by two torpedoes fired from U-160. The Germans questioned the survivors and again, a misunderstanding resulted in the incorrect name being reported, this time the Aelybryn was reported as being the Arian. Out of the 41 on board, The Lourenço Marques picked up 32 survivors and landed them in Cape Town, meaning nine lives were lost. This was the Aelybryn’s second time being attacked by a German U-boat, having had an encounter with U-556 two years earlier which it managed to survive with some damage and the loss of life of one crew member. As for the fate of U-160 and its crew, they were sunk by the US Navy on the 14th of July 1943, near the Azores islands in the North-Eastern Atlantic.

1944: UIT-22, this Italian submarine, which was taken over by the Germans after the Italians surrendered, was sunk south of Cape Point in the Western Cape. During operation “Wicketkeeper”, three RAF Catalina’s went hunting for three known U-boats near Cape Point.

The German submarine UIT-22 leaves Bordeaux for the last time

Pilot Officer, FJ “Fred” Roddick spotted one and opened fire with all of his guns, managing to also drop five depth charges on it.

UIT-22 under attack

His Catalina sustained much damage and had to return to base, but Wing Commander ESS "Gar" Nash had arrived, and he dropped six depth charges on top of submarine when it surfaced, sinking it. All 46 on board were killed.

Attack on German U-boats, 1944. Aerial attack on the Italian submarine, believed to be ex-Alpino Bagnolini, now German UIT 22, on its way to Penang, March 11, 1944. The submarine did not reach its port bound for, but was sunk near the Cape of Good Hope. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives

1968: Dirkie Uys, this motor-powered vessel wrecked at Cape Infanta in the Western Cape.

1971: Gansie Een, this motor-powered fishing vessel wrecked opposite Die Baken near Arniston/Waenhuiskrans in the Western Cape. One life was lost because of the wrecking.

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Saturday 6 April 2024

South Africa: Cerberus, Stoic, Pickle & René Sethren shipwrecks

SAHRA Maritime and Underwater Cultural Heritage

March 10:

“This day in our shipwreck and aeronautical wreck history”

1821: Cerberus, this wooden sailing vessel ran aground on Blaauwbergstrand in Table Bay in the Western Cape. Although attempts were made to get it off, by the 22nd it was decided that the vessel would be lost and it remained there, becoming a wreck.

1858: Stoic, this wooden sailing cutter wrecked north of the M’bashe Lighthouse, halfway between East London and Port St Johns in the Eastern Cape. It is believed that this was the first vessel built in East London.

1939: Pickle, this South African fishing vessel sank in the then Port Elizabeth harbour in Algoa Bay in the Eastern Cape. It was later raised and scuttled in Algoa Bay.

2010: René Sethren, this South African Navy strike craft (P1566) was intentionally scuttled by a missile during a military exercise off Cape Point in the Western Cape. 

P1566 strike craft at an unknown date and location

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